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Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is an organization’s commitment to produce an overall positive impact on society.  CSR encompasses sustainability, social and economic impact, and business ethics.  It makes a company socially accountable of its operations, stakeholders, and the public.  Businesses undertake CSR programs to benefit society while boosting their own brands.

CSR affects every aspect of business operations and functions.  Encouraging equal opportunities; partnering with organizations practicing ethical business methods; putting part of earnings back into environment, health, and safety initiatives; and taking care of communities and charity are all examples of CSR initiatives.

Communities, customers, employees, and media consider CSR vital and gauge companies based on these initiatives.  Executives of leading companies consider CSR as an opportunity to deal with critical issues innovatively, reinforce their organizations, and serve the society simultaneously.

The Need for CSR Implementation

Organizations need to come up with a robust approach to unlock potential benefits and value from CSR for them and for the society.  The organizations practicing Corporate Social Responsibility do that with one of the following 4 objectives in mind:

  • Philanthropy:  These initiatives (e.g. corporate donations) make the companies and society feel good, but produce low value for the business—questionable repute building benefits to companies, but offer much to society.
  • Propaganda:  These CSR initiatives are predominantly geared towards promoting a company’s standing, but offer little real value for the society.  This form of CSR is more of advertisement and becomes risky if there are any gaps between the firm’s commitments and actions.
  • Pet Projects:  Some companies engage in CSR initiatives that support the personal interests of senior executives.  These initiatives are much touted about, but are actually of little value to the business or community.
  • Smart Partnering:  These initiatives concentrate on common themes between the business and the community.  Organizations, in this case, create innovative solutions by drawing synergies from partnerships to tackle major issues concerning all stakeholders.

Among these objectives, Smart Partnering offers maximum opportunities for shared value creation and finding solutions to crucial business and social challenges.  Whereas for the society, smart partnering helps create more employment opportunities, improve livelihoods, and enhance the quality of life.

Guiding Principles for CSR Initiative Selection 

An effective way for the companies to maximize benefits of their CSR efforts is to map the current initiatives; identify the objectives, benefits, and resources responsible for realizing value from those initiatives; and define the projects valuable for addressing key strategic challenges.

Pet projects, philanthropy, or propaganda are easy to plan and execute.  However, the real issue is to implement CSR opportunities that bring value for the business as well as society (smart partnering).  This goal can be achieved by applying these 3 guiding principles:

  1. Focus on the right segments

Real opportunities lie in the segments where the business collaborates with and influences the society the most.  These segments help the business interpret mutual dependencies and uncover maximum mutual benefit.

  1. Recognize challenges and benefits

After finalizing the opportunity segments, it is imperative to appreciate the potential for mutual benefit.  The key is to find the right balance between the business and community and recognize the challenges that both sides face.

  1. Find the right partners

Collaboration with right partners—who benefit from business endeavors and capabilities of each other—creates a win–win situation for both sides and motivates them to achieve mutual value.  Sustainable collaboration demands long-term alliances and deeper insights on the strengths of each other.

These principles are helpful in selecting appropriate CSR opportunities, identifying societal and business needs to be addressed, and the required resources and capabilities.

The Case for CSR Benefits 

The goal of unlocking mutual benefits—associated with CSR (specifically Smart Partnering)—is critical for long-term success of the program.  As required by any other strategic initiative, the mutual value creation objective needs to be carefully assessed based on the true value-creation potential, prioritized, designed, staffed, and audited.

The next step is to outline the list of potential benefits for the business and community.  A well-defined business case and a compelling story immensely helps involve and gain commitment from the senior leadership, investors, and employees.

Interested in learning more about how to tap CSR opportunities effectively? You can download an editable PowerPoint on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Opportunities here on the Flevy documents marketplace.

Are you a Management Consultant?

You can download this and hundreds of other consulting frameworks and consulting training guides from the FlevyPro library.

assemble-challenge-combine-269399Takeovers can turnaround companies in a short period of time, but there is a significant degree of risk to be anticipated and mitigated prior to undertaking such transactions. Lack of careful deliberation of the potential risks, insufficient planning, weak execution, and lack of focus on Post-merger Integration are the major reasons why many Merger & Acquisition deals fail to achieve their desired goals.

The course of an M&A transaction has to be set at an early stage, way before the actual deal closure. The period prior to the deal approval by the regulatory authorities and while due diligence is being done is most critical, and should be utilized by the leadership to clearly define the goals of integration, the potential risks, and a layout for the execution of the actual integration process. It is the right time to perform a structured evaluation of 3 core pre-merger considerations associated with such deals, i.e.:

  1. Strategic Objectives
  2. Organization & Culture
  3. Takeover Approach

Understanding these PMI Pre-merger considerations helps the stakeholders ascertain the unique challenges and constraints related to M&A transactions and make informed decisions. These considerations assist in developing a systematic approach to undertaking a Post-merger Integration (PMI) — which is devoid of any “gut decisions,” and ensures realization of synergies and value. These considerations set the direction and pace of the post-merger integration process.

Now, let’s discuss the 3 core considerations in detail.

Strategic Objectives

Organizations undertake Mergers and Acquisitions as a way to accelerate their growth rather than growing organically. The foremost core consideration associated with an M&A transaction is the strategic objectives that the organizational leadership wants to achieve out of it.

M&A deals take place to fulfill one or more of these 5 strategic objectives:

  • Reinforcement of a segment
  • Extension in new geographies
  • Expansion of product range
  • Acquisition of new capabilities
  • Venturing into a new domain

The PMI approach needs to be tailored in accordance with the desired strategic objectives of the deal.

Organization & Culture

The senior management should be mindful of the significance of organizational and cultural differences in the two organizations that often become barriers to M&A deals. Small companies, typically, have an entrepreneurial outlook and culture where there aren’t any formal structure and the owner controls (and relays) all the information and decision making. Whereas, large corporations typically have formal structures and well-defined procedures.

A takeover of a small firm by a large entity is bound to stir criticism and disagreement. M&A process often faces long delays between the offer, deal signing, and closing — due to antitrust reviews or management’s indecisiveness — triggering suspicion among people. This should be mitigated during the PMI process by orienting the people of the small firm with the new culture and giving them time to transition effectively.

For M&A deals to be effective, leadership needs to carefully evaluate the behavioral elements of the organizational culture and contemplate the overriding principles guiding a company.

Takeover Approach

Integrating the operations of two companies proves to be a much more difficult task in practice than it seems theoretically. Organizations have the option of selecting the takeover approach most suitable for them from the following 4 methodologies — based on their organizational structures, people, management, processes, and culture:

  1. Direct Hit
  2. Hiatus
  3. Deferred Decisions
  4. Quick and Unsympathetic Disposal

Interesting in learning more about the takeover approach and the pre-merger considerations in detail? You can download an editable PowerPoint on Post-merger Integration: Pre-merger Considerations here on the Flevy documents marketplace.

Are you a Management Consultant?

You can download this and hundreds of other consulting frameworks and consulting training guides from the FlevyPro library.

Money GlobeStiff market competition, expansion into new territories, product portfolio extension, and gaining new capabilities are the prime reasons why more and more organizations are seriously looking into the prospects of—and carrying out—Mergers and Acquisitions. However, only a few M&As achieve their desired revenue objectives.

Revenue Synergies are a decisive factor in closing such deals. However, identifying precisely where these Revenue Synergies lie and then capturing them isn’t as easy as it sounds.

McKinsey study comprising of 200 M&A executives from 10 different sectors revealed that all the respective organizations of the respondents remained short of achieving their Revenue Synergy targets (~23% short of the target on average). Securing Revenue Synergies is a long-term game. The companies that succeed in securing Revenue Synergies achieve the target in or around 5 years.

Leaders aspiring to achieve Revenue Synergies should first clarify the objectives from and the schedule of the revenue synergies, lay out the organizational priorities and go-to-market strategies, remove obstacles from realizing value, and gain across the board readiness and commitment for the initiative. Organizations that are most successful in securing revenue synergies pay close attention to these 7 guiding principles during the Post-merger Integration process:

  1. Source of Synergies
  2. Leadership Ownership
  3. Customer Insight-driven Opportunities
  4. Salesperson Driven Strategy
  5. Ambitious Targets and Incentives
  6. Sufficient Support
  7. Performance Management
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These 7 guiding principles to capturing Revenue Synergies are critical for effective integration of two firms after a merger and unlocking potential benefits from the deal. Let’s discuss the first 3 principles in detail now.

1. Source of Synergies

The inability of the leadership of the acquiring company to spot major sources of revenue that integration brings in results in losing significant pools of opportunity and failure of M&As. Realizing Revenue Synergies demands a thorough methodology to ascertain and qualify revenue prospects along markets and channels, Go-to-Market Strategies, and developing commercial capabilities. This entails:

  • Evaluating customers and markets, selling offerings of the combined firms utilizing existing and additional channels, and adequately training and rewarding the sales teams.
  • Coming up with innovative new products and bundles utilizing combined R&D capabilities.
  • Sharing best practices and commercial capabilities that mergers offer.

2. Leadership Ownership

Organizations that accomplish their Revenue Synergy objectives guarantee that their top management and employees commit themselves fully to the initiative from the onset. They identify potential value pockets from the integration, examine the assumptions about securing value, and get them endorsed by the senior management and front-line staff. The potential Revenue Strategies are regularly evaluated by inter-departmental experts.

3. Customer Insight-driven Opportunities

Accurate estimation of Revenue Synergies demands top-level estimates—assumptions on market share gain, revenue enhancement, or improved penetration—alongside comprehensive bottom-up customer insights, and evaluation of customer relationships. Other important elements to consider include analyzing the offerings being offered to customers, discerning other potential products and services required by the customers, and assessing the ability of the sales team and brands in terms of the potential they offer to the clients.

Interested in learning more about the other guiding principles of securing PMI revenue synergies? You can download an editable PowerPoint on Post-merger Integration (PMI): Securing Revenue Synergies here on the Flevy documents marketplace.

Are you a Management Consultant?

You can download this and hundreds of other consulting frameworks and consulting training guides from the FlevyPro library.

Here is a compilation of the free PowerPoint documents we’ve made available through the course of 2011.

Holiday Gift PowerPoint Toolkit
http://learnppt.com/downloads/holiday-gift/
Here is a collection of 20+ PowerPoint diagrams, templates, and charts, originally created as a holiday gift to LearnPPT’s newsletter subscribers.

Process Optimization Presentation
http://learnppt.com/downloads/process-optimization/
This is a process optimization presentation.  It is the accompanying download for this PowerPoint tutorial:
http://powerpointing-templates.com/2011/10/slide-from-scratch-process-optimization-presentation/

Business Strategy Update Presentation
http://learnppt.com/downloads/strategy-update/
This is a presentation showing a business strategy update.  It is the accompanying download for this PowerPoint tutorial:
http://powerpointing-templates.com/2011/09/business-strategy-update-presentation/

Agenda and Transition Slide Template
http://learnppt.com/downloads/agenda-contents/
This is a simple, clean, table-based template used for creating the agenda slide and transition slides.

Cone Diagrams
http://learnppt.com/downloads/cone_diagrams/
This is a set of cone diagrams.  Creating a cone diagram yourself is simple, as illustrated by the accompanying tutorial:
http://powerpointing-templates.com/2011/06/powerpointing-how-to-create-a-cone-diagram/

Decision Tree Template
http://learnppt.com/downloads/decision-tree-powerpoint-template/
This is a fancy looking decision tree diagram/template.  It was created originally for a client slide that was scrapped.  You can modify it to include additional decision points and outcomes.

Diamond Diagram
http://learnppt.com/downloads/diamonds/
This is a set of diamond diagrams of various segments.  It is created using the built-in Radar charts, as illustrated in the accompanying tutorial:
http://powerpointing-templates.com/2011/02/powerpointing-how-to-create-a-diamond-diagram/

Want to add more free PowerPoints to your collection?  Check out our free PowerPoint downloads of 2010 (26 in all last year):
http://powerpointing-templates.com/2010/12/free-powerpoint-downloads-of-2010/

Thanks for reading our blog!

Questions, thoughts, concerns?  Go to my site (learnppt.com) and shoot me an email.

For pre-made PowerPoint diagrams used in business presentations and other powerpointing needs, browse our library here: learnppt.com/powerpoint/.  These diagrams were professionally designed by management consultants. Give your presentations the look and feel of a final product made by McKinsey, BCG, Bain, Booz Allen, Deloitte, or any of the top consulting firms.

One of the easiest diagrams to create is the Cone Diagram. In fact, it’s just the piecing together of 2 shapes: a triangle (for the body) and a circle (for the opening).  Just see below.

To enhance the look of the circular opening, I like to change the background color fill of the circle using a linear gradient.

Similar to the PowerPoint funnel diagram, a cone diagram is a great tool to illustrate a downselection or filtering down process.   Likewise, you can also easily build upon the cone diagram to show added layers and direction of flow.  See the examples below.

You can download all the cone diagrams shown in this PowerPoint tutorial here (http://learnppt.com/downloads/cone_diagrams/).  Enjoy.

You can also download a free PowerPoint plugin called Flevy Tools that creates commonly used consulting diagrams: http://flevy.com/powerpoint-plugin.  Flevy Tools allows you to dynamically generate Gantt Charts, Harvey Ball diagrams, approach diagrams, and other diagrams.  For the time being, it’s a completely free download.

Questions, thoughts, concerns?  Go to my site (learnppt.com) and shoot me an email.

For pre-made PowerPoint templates used in business presentations, browse our library here: learnppt.com/powerpoint/.  These diagrams were professionally designed by management consultants. Give your presentations the look and feel of a final product made by McKinsey, BCG, Bain, Booz Allen, Deloitte, or any of the top consulting firms.

http://powerpointing-templates.com/2010/07/how-to-create-a-funnel-diagram-in-powerpoint/

Through this Sunday, learnPPT is having a promo for the Cost Reduction Toolkit.  This detailed document identifies over 45+ cost cutting initiatives across the Value Chain.  For each initiative, examples are provided, along with projected potential savings.

The Cost Management opportunities are broken down into the areas of:

  • Enterprise-wide - These opportunities are cross-functional, meaning they can affect multiple functions within an organization.  The impact is largely to SG&A costs.
  • Asset Management - These opportunities target the improvement of fixed assets efficiency and decreasing net working capital.  The impact is largely capital efficiency.
  • Function-specific - Opportunities in this category are specific to primary and support functional activities.  These are operational and transactional in nature.

This toolkit also explains the levers and challenges to profitability, as well as the formula identifying cost reduction opportunities.

Here’s a partial preview of the PowerPoint presentation.

Questions, thoughts, concerns?  Go to my site (learnppt.com) and shoot me an email.

For pre-made PowerPoint diagrams used in business presentations and other powerpointing needs, browse our library here: learnppt.com/powerpoint/.  These diagrams were professionally designed by management consultants. Give your presentations the look and feel of a final product made by McKinsey, BCG, Bain, Booz Allen, Deloitte, or any of the top consulting firms.

For a current consulting engagement, we prepared a presentation for the management team to brainstorm various growth strategy options.   To facilitate this discussion, we created a decision tree diagram outlining the key decision points and the most viable options pivoting from each decision point.

I wanted to make this diagram especially intuitive.  So, I embedded an image of a tree with deep roots (that I found off Google Image) as backdrop to the slide.  See below.

To create this backdrop/watermark effect, I used a very simple technique.  After finding an appropriate image, I merely copied it into the slide and placed it behind a large white rectangle.  I then set the transparency of the white rectangle to 20% (under the ‘Format AutoShape’ properties window).  The transparent white box grayed out the image into the background.

If you would like to use this decision tree diagram in your business presentation, I’ve made it available for download here: Decision Tree PowerPoint template.  I realize I make a lot of one-time throw-away slides.  Might as well make them available for download on this site, right? :)

By the way, you can download a free PowerPoint plugin called Flevy Tools that creates commonly used consulting diagrams here: http://flevy.com/powerpoint-plugin.  Flevy Tools allows you to dynamically generate Gantt Charts, Harvey Ball diagrams, approach diagrams, and other diagrams.  For the time being, it’s a completely free download.

Questions, thoughts, concerns?  Go to my site (learnppt.com) and shoot me an email.

For pre-made PowerPoint diagrams used in business presentations and other powerpointing needs, browse our library here: learnppt.com/powerpoint/.  These diagrams were professionally designed by management consultants. Give your presentations the look and feel of a final product made by McKinsey, BCG, Bain, Booz Allen, Deloitte, or any of the top consulting firms.

A diamond diagram or a segment diagram is a very useful and flexible diagram.  You can use them to illustrate anything that has multiple contributing components.  The powerpointing technique taught in this tutorial is a great one to have in your growing PowerPoint diagramming skill set.

Here are some examples of situations that can be intuitively portrayed using diamond diagrams:

  • Multi-departmental collaboration – Product X’s product launch requires input from Product Development, Marketing, Sales, and Partners
  • Multi-pronged sales strategy – Product X’s go-to-market strategy includes Selling to China, Moving from SMB to Enterprise, Cross-selling with Product Y, Attacking the Financial Vertical, and Attacking the Healthcare Vertical
  • A product’s value proposition – Product X’s value proposition includes Water Conservation, Energy Savings, Durability, Compact Size, and Time Savings.

Now, there’s an incredibly easy way to create a Diamond Diagram in PowerPoint!

First, create a chart in PowerPoint and change the ‘Chart Type’ to ‘Radar Chart.’


Next, modify the chart values.  First, only leave 2 rows of data.  Then, create as many columns as you would like segments.  In our example, we will create a diamond with 5 segments.  For the first row, set all the values to 1.  For the second, set all the values to 2.  UPDATE – The screenshot below is from PowerPoint 2003.  For PowerPoint 2007 and 2010, the datasheet format is vertical–not horizontal (like you see in the image below). Therefore, you must input your values vertically (i.e. 1s and 2s in the same columns, not rows)


Next, change the line color for both of the data lines to black.  Then, format the chart such that you remove the axis labels and set both the major and minor units to 1.

Your chart should now look like this.  We pretty much have it.


I’m going to do some formatting, including replacing the inner section with a Pentagon AutoShape.

There we have it — a quick and easy powerpointing trick to create a Diamond or Segment Diagram using Radar Charts in PowerPoint.

Here are a couple more Diamond Diagrams with a different number of sides:

You can download the above slides from LearnPPT @ http://learnppt.com/downloads/diamonds/

If you are looking a larger variety of Segment Powerpoint templates, pre-built and ready to use, check out the Relationship, Segment, and Network Diagrams PowerPoint Pack:

http://learnppt.com/powerpoint/13_Relationship%2C-Segment%2C-%26-Network-Diagrams.php

Also, you can download a free PowerPoint plugin called Flevy Tools that creates commonly used consulting diagrams here: http://flevy.com/powerpoint-plugin.  Flevy Tools allows you to dynamically generate Gantt Charts, Harvey Ball diagrams, approach diagrams, and other diagrams.  For the time being, it’s a completely free download.

Questions, thoughts, concerns?  Go to my site (learnppt.com) and shoot me an email.

For pre-made PowerPoint diagrams used in business presentations and other powerpointing needs, browse our library here: learnppt.com/powerpoint/.  These diagrams were professionally designed by management consultants. Give your presentations the look and feel of a final product made by McKinsey, BCG, Bain, Booz Allen, Deloitte, or any of the top consulting firms.

A couple more days and we’re done with 2010.  Hope everyone  has had a memorable and successful year.

This year marked the launch of both this blog and its parent PowerPoint resource site, Learn PowerPoint.  This blog post is a recap of all free ppt downloads that have been made available through both of these sources.

Enjoy!

1-19. Free PowerPoint Templates
In 2010, we created 19 PowerPoint templates made available for free downloads.  These have been our most downloaded free PowerPoints and span across a wide array of industries, including medical, technology, and business, to name a few.

Become a PowerPoint Guru book support materials
Become a PowerPoint Guru is a guide around creating effective business presentations using techniques and methodologies developed by consulting firms, like McKinsey, BCG, and Bain.  The focus is very similar to that of this blog, e.g. powerpointing tricks, slide design, PowerPoint chart usages, etc.

  • 21. Download the Basic Toolkit — this is a collection of pre-built, customizable PowerPoint diagrams.  The eBook comes with a much more comprehensive PowerPoint toolkit (which you can preview here).

Miscellaneous PowerPoint Diagrams and PowerPoint Templates
The links below are to pre-built PowerPoints that have largely been created in supported of our blog posts, many from our powerpointing tutorials.

22. Marketing Strategy PowerPoint Templates
Download – http://learnppt.com/downloads/3prongstrategy/
Tutorial – http://powerpointing-templates.com/2010/07/slide-from-scratch-3-prong-marketing-strategy/

23. Funnel Diagrams in PowerPoint
Download – http://learnppt.com/downloads/funnel_diagrams/
Tutorial – http://powerpointing-templates.com/2010/07/how-to-create-a-funnel-diagram-in-powerpoint/

24. Project Charter PowerPoint Template
Download – http://learnppt.com/downloads/project_charter/
Tutorial – http://powerpointing-templates.com/2010/11/the-blueprint-for-projects-success-a-project-charter/

25. PowerPoint Waterfall Chart Diagrams
Download – http://learnppt.com/downloads/waterfallcharts/
Tutorial – http://powerpointing-templates.com/2010/12/powerpointing-how-to-create-a-waterfall-chart-in-powerpoint/

26. Consulting Presentation Framework Template
Download – http://learnppt.com/downloads/sampletemplate/
Tutorial – http://ezinearticles.com/?The-Management-Consulting-Presentation-Framework&id=4423363

Expect more free PowerPoint diagrams and templates to come in 2011.  Thanks for reading!

Questions, thoughts, concerns?  Go to my site (learnppt.com) and shoot me an email.

For pre-made PowerPoint diagrams used in business presentations and other powerpointing needs, browse our library here: learnppt.com/powerpoint/.  These diagrams were professionally designed by management consultants. Give your presentations the look and feel of a final product made by McKinsey, BCG, Bain, Booz Allen, Deloitte, or any of the top consulting firms.

Strategy in business is about winning and so, any successful business needs to have a well defined, executable strategy.  Unsurprisingly, from both sales trends and customer feedback, at learnppt.com, we have found ourselves adding more and more products around this topic of business strategy.

This weekend, I took the time to compile all of our toolkits and frameworks related to business and strategy.  Browse it here:
Business Strategy

Some of the topics discussed you will find include Growth Strategy, Marketing Strategy, and Management Strategy.

Our most recent PowerPoint in this domain teaches you how organizations can inject Creative Thinking into their Strategy Development processes:
Creative Thinking in Strategy Development
This document discusses the 3 enablers to creativity in strategy formulation:

  • Ensuring the right “conditions” are in place
  • Pushing the limits of conventional thinking
  • Leveraging the power of collaborative thinking

Got a request in PowerPoint product of blog post topic?  Leave a comment or shoot me an email.

Cheers!