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This is the second tutorial in the “Slide from Scratch” series.  In the first, we walked through an example of creating a 3-Prong Marketing Strategy on a PowerPoint slide.

In evaluating any business function, creating process flows is an inevitable task.  I’m sure you have had to create your fair share of process flows in the past.

The big problem with process flow diagrams is that they often grow to become overly-complicated and therefore, very difficult to interpret.  There are too many lines going everywhere.  Lines are criss crossing (very confusing!).  Boxes aren’t aligned nor similarly sized (creates misdirection around importance of step).


Okay, let’s begin.

The Premise

You need to create a slide illustrating a high-level billing process.  The process begins with the system-triggered invoice generation and ends with a customer service rep resolving a billing inquiry.

Slide Design

These are the simple steps I follow when constructing a process flow from scratch.

Step 1. Swim Lanes

The first step is to define your swim lanes, which are horizontal cross sections of your process flow corresponding to distinct groups that touch the process.  Swim lanes add structure to your flow and are easy for people to understand.

I like to break process flows into 3 swim lanes:

  • System - Capturing automated steps that are performed by a system/software
  • Manual - Capturing manual tasks done by people within the organization
  • External - Capturing any task performed outside of the organization (e.g. 3rd party vendor, customer)

I create my swim lanes using a table in PowerPoint.


Step 2. Add your Steps

Each step is represented with a box.  There are number of standard process flow shapes.  There’s no need to use the standard shapes.  Why?  Simply, most people don’t know what the standard shapes anyway–and  so, using all the official, standard shapes may confuse your audience.  Your goal is to create a process flow diagram that is very intuitive for your audience to understand and digest.

In fact, I recommend using icons that are non-standard, but intuitive, such as the ‘person’ icon to manual nature of an activity.  There are 4 primary shapes/icons that I like to use, as shown in the picture below.


At learnppt.com, we’ve compiled a collection of People & Process Icons that you can use in your process flows.

So, in this step, add all your boxes.  Structure the flow of your steps from the left-to-right, top-to-bottom. Don’t connect anything yet, as you will likely need to re-arrange and re-size your boxes to ensure they all fit on your slide in an easily readable manner.

I like to also add a box on the top right of the slide indicating the frequency of the process (e.g. daily, weekly, or monthly).

Step 3. Add your lines

This is very important — Use the AutoShape Elbow Arrow Connectors to connect your shapes.  Connectors ensure your lines are straight and connected to the centers of shapes.  Most importantly, when you move around boxes, your Connectors remain in tact.  This saves a ton of time as you go through multiple iterations of your process flow.


Sometimes, you Connector won’t connect to the part of the shape you would like it to.  There’s an easy work around to this.  Create a small box to use as your proxy end connection point.  I.e., connect your Connector to this small box and move this box to where you would like the Connector to go.  Then, make the small box disappear by removing its fill color.

Avoid criss crossing at all costs.  If you have a situation where this is impossible, then replace one of the Connector AutoShapes with a Curve (line) AutoShape.

Now, here’s our final product with all the lines added.  You can download this slide/example here.

Add a couple embellishments, and here’s a slightly more refined version.

For more information related to process analysis and optimization, check out the Cost Reduction Toolkit.  This Toolkit takes a detailed look at process improvements across the entire Value Chain of a company (as defined by strategist Michael Porter [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Value_chain]).  Here are other various resources you may be interested in:

You can download a free PowerPoint plugin called Flevy Tools that creates commonly used consulting diagrams here: http://flevy.com/powerpoint-plugin.  Flevy Tools allows you to dynamically generate Gantt Charts, Harvey Ball diagrams, approach diagrams, and other diagrams.  For the time being, it’s a completely free download.

Questions, thoughts, concerns?  Go to my site (learnppt.com) and shoot me an email.  On my site, you will find information about my recent eBook, Become a PowerPoint Guru, which teaches how to create effective business presentations (from structuring your story to designing your diagrams).

For pre-made PowerPoint diagrams used in business presentations, browse Flevy’s library here: https://flevy.com/function/PowerPoint-Templates-ppt.  These diagrams were professionally designed by management consultants. Give your presentations the look and feel of a final product made by McKinsey, BCG, Bain, Booz Allen, Deloitte, or any of the top consulting firms.

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In any corporate engagement, it is invaluable to have clearly defined Project Charter.  This charter helps provide focus and direction.  It is the team’s blueprint for success!

The Project Charter has 5 primary objectives:

  1. Provide an overview summary of the project, including high-level background.
  2. Outline the team’s approach to executing this project.
  3. Aid in selecting participants.
  4. Identify team members, clarifies roles, and their responsibilities.
  5. List specific deliverables and milestones.

To achieve these goals, your typical Charter consists 8 areas:

  • Objectives – Definitely lay out the project’s core objectives that the team is set to accomplish.  These objectives should be SMART (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic, and Time-bound) where possible.
  • In Scope – State what is in scope.
  • Out of Scope – Equally as important, state what is out of the project’s scope of work.
  • Key Activities — Outline the major steps the team will need to take.
  • Deliverables — Delineate the tangible work products the team will deliver to accomplish its objectives.
  • Sponsor — Specify the executive sponsor member who will be responsible for resolving major issues and provide direction when needed.  Escalation procedures should involve the sponsor.
  • Resources — List the members of the organization that will be supporting the project.  Include external resources, such as hired consultants, if needed.
  • CSFs (Critical Success Factors) — Define the elements which need to be fulfilled in order to realize the deliverables.  These should be quantifiable where possible.  To learn more about defining CSFs, check out this product.  These are also referred to as Key Success Factors.

A PowerPoint template of a Project Charter is displayed below.  It is created by piecing together tables in PowerPoint.  Remember, to resize table edges to the pixel, hold down the ALT key as you drag the edge.

For your inconvenience, you can also download this template from learnppt (http://learnppt.com/downloads/project_charter/).


Along with the Charter, there is usually a detailed Gantt chart that breaks down the Key Activities section of the Charter.  The Gantt chart adds a timing component to each activity and offers a visual illustrating dependencies across activities and work streams.  We have PowerPoint Diagrams Pack with various Gantt charts, calendars, meeting schedules, and other timeline diagrams at learnppt.com as well:
http://learnppt.com/powerpoint/23_Gantt-Charts%2C-Schedules%2C-and-Calendars.php

You can download a free PowerPoint plugin called Flevy Tools that creates Gantt charts, among other commonly used project management diagrams here: http://flevy.com/powerpoint-plugin.  For the time being, it’s a completely free download.

Questions, thoughts, concerns?  Go to my site (learnppt.com) and shoot me an email.  On my site, you will find information about my recent eBook, Become a PowerPoint Guru, which teaches how to create effective business presentations (from structuring your story to designing your diagrams).

For pre-made PowerPoint diagrams used in business presentations, browse our library here: learnppt.com/powerpoint/.  These diagrams were professionally designed by management consultants. Give your presentations the look and feel of a final product made by McKinsey, BCG, Bain, Booz Allen, Deloitte, or any of the top consulting firms.

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The “Crawl Walk Run” approach is a great way for executives to frame and communicate change.  This is particularly useful and most relevant to organizations growing from mid-size to enterprise.

During this transition, organizations need to create scalable processes, implement enterprise-wide systems, and potentially redefine their organizational structure.  When faced with a lot of changes, it is important to prioritize them in a way that an organization can understand and execute against.

To do this, executives often structure changes under the Crawl Walk Run framework, where

  • Crawl changes are immediate quick wins.  They can be implemented easily and lay the groundwork for bigger, more impactful changes down the road.
  • Walk changes are near-term.  These have a longer time frame than the Crawl changes.  These may included process changes, easy IT upgrades, or headcount changes.
  • Run changes are long-term objectives.  In the Run state, an organization will embrace world class leading practices.  These changes may include an ERP implementation, a organizational restructure, or adoption of an outsourcing model.

As one would suspect, there are standard Crawl Walk Run diagrams used in PowerPoint presentations.  On an initial slide, the Crawl Walk Run framework is presented with a high level descriptions capturing each of the Crawl, Walk, and Run stages.  Then, successive slides dive deeper into each stage, breaking down the specific changes and target time frames for completion.


You can find Crawl Walk Run diagrams and templates at LearnPPT.
http://learnppt.com/powerpoint/21_MiniPack—Crawl-Walk-Run.php

There are also many variations to this rudimentary framework to illustrate different levels of change and progress, including:

  • Crawl, Walk, Run, Sprint!
  • Crawl, Walk, Run, Fly!
  • Crawl, Creep, Walk, Run

This article was written by David Tracy.

Questions, thoughts, concerns?  Go to my site (learnppt.com) and shoot me an email.

For pre-made PowerPoint diagrams used in business presentations, browse our library here: learnppt.com/powerpoint/.  These diagrams were professionally designed by management consultants. Give your presentations the look and feel of a final product made by McKinsey, BCG, Bain, Booz Allen, Deloitte, or any of the top consulting firms.

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Creating a linear approach with a distinct start and end is simple.  Just piece  together a number of chevrons.  But, how about a circular approach PowerPoint diagram?

There are a number of ways to do this in PowerPoint.  I’ll teach you the easiest method in this PowerPoint tutorial.

First, let’s gather the shapes.  To create a simple circular approach diagram, you need at least 4 shapes.

  1. A large circle. This will be the outer edge of your diagram.  You need to set both a border color and fill color.
  2. A small circle. This will be the inner of your PowerPoint diagram.  Set the fill color to white.
  3. An arrow. Set the border and fill colors to the same as your larger circle
  4. A line. Set this line’s color to be the same as the diagram’s fill color.

See the diagram below.

Now, let’s piece the shapes together to form the PowerPoint diagram.  See the final creation below to visualize how the pieces fit together.  Remember, to resize a shape to the pixel, hold down the ALT key.

Note how the line is used to cover up the base edge of the arrow AutoShape.  To create additional segments in your diagram, just take the arrow+line (i.e. shapes 3 and 4).  Group them, replicate, rotate, and re-position.  Simple as that.

The downside to this method of creating a circular approach is you cannot highlight a particular segment with a different color.  On learnppt.com, we have a full PowerPoint Diagrams Pack around Circular Approach and Force Diagrams (http://learnppt.com/powerpoint/6_Circular-Approaches-and-Force-Diagrams.php).

Here are some fancier circular approach diagrams.

Questions, thoughts, concerns?  Go to my site (learnppt.com) and shoot me an email.

You can download a free PowerPoint plugin called Flevy Tools that creates commonly used consulting diagrams here: http://flevy.com/powerpoint-plugin.  Flevy Tools allows you to dynamically generate Gantt Charts, Harvey Ball diagrams, approach diagrams, and other diagrams.  For the time being, it’s a completely free download.

For pre-made PowerPoint diagrams used in business presentations, browse our library here: learnppt.com/powerpoint/.  These diagrams were professionally designed by management consultants. Give your presentations the look and feel of a final product made by McKinsey, BCG, Bain, Booz Allen, Deloitte, or any of the top consulting firms.

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Recently, I had the pleasure of being interviewed by Geetesh Bajaj at Indezine, where we discussed my PowerPoint book Become a PowerPoint Guru.

You can read the full interview here:
http://blog.indezine.com/2010/07/become-powerpoint-guru-conversation.html

Indezine
http://www.indezine.com/
Indezine is a leading online resource for PowerPoint users. Check it out. You can find articles, tutorials, and templates.

—–

Questions, thoughts, concerns?  Go to my site (learnppt.com) and shoot me an email.

For pre-made PowerPoint diagrams used in business presentations, browse our library here: learnppt.com/powerpoint/.  These diagrams were professionally designed by management consultants. Give your presentations the look and feel of a final product made by McKinsey, BCG, Bain, Booz Allen, Deloitte, or any of the top consulting firms.

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A PowerPoint diagram in the shape of a funnel is both useful and intuitive to understand.  In this entry, I’ll go through a simple way to create a funnel diagram in PowerPoint.

First, let’s gather the shapes.  To create a simple funnel, you only  need 4 shapes:

  1. A large circle. The border (width 2 1/4) is the color of your funnel.  Set the fill color to white.
  2. A downwards triangle. This is the main body of the funnel, so set the color as your funnel color.
  3. A rectangle. Set this color to your funnel color.
  4. A small circle. Also set this color to your funnel color.

See the diagram below.

Now, let’s piece the shapes together to form a funnel.  Attach the large circle to the top of the triangle to form the opening.  The rectangle and small circle form the bottom of the funnel.

See the final creation below.  Note, to resize a shape to the pixel, hold down the ALT key.

There you have it.  A funnel diagram is a great way to illustrate a downsizing/reduction, downselection, filtering down process.  Specific examples include a Flow of Marketing Leads to Sales Leads, Downselection of Vendors, and Product Development from Ideation to R&D.

It’s also very easy to add embellishments to the funnel diagram for a more specific purpose.  See the 2 examples below.

You can download all the funnel diagrams shown in this PowerPoint tutorial here (http://learnppt.com/downloads/funnel_diagrams/).  Enjoy.

Also, you can download a free PowerPoint plugin called Flevy Tools that creates commonly used consulting diagrams here: http://flevy.com/powerpoint-plugin.  Flevy Tools allows you to dynamically generate Gantt Charts, Harvey Ball diagrams, approach diagrams, and other diagrams.  For the time being, it’s a completely free download.

Questions, thoughts, concerns?  Go to my site (learnppt.com) and shoot me an email.

For pre-made PowerPoint diagrams used in business presentations, browse our library here: learnppt.com/powerpoint/.  These diagrams were professionally designed by management consultants. Give your presentations the look and feel of a final product made by McKinsey, BCG, Bain, Booz Allen, Deloitte, or any of the top consulting firms.

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I believe one of the best ways to learn is through example.  And so, I am starting a new series on my blog, which I will be calling “Slide from Scratch.”  For each of these posts, I will walk through a real example of a slide I had to create, going from initial conceptualization of just ideas to creation of the final slide.

This will be the first post of the series.  I will walk through creating a slide for a 3-prong marketing strategy.

The Premise

You need to create a slide illustrating your company’s marketing strategy for 2010.  The strategy focuses on 3 areas, and, for the sake of this example, let’s say they are the following:

  • Expansion to China
  • Strengthening your company’s online presence
  • Create a brand image for your company as the “value player”

The success of your marketing efforts is measured on the number of leads generated, which let’s say is X leads for 2010.  The marketing team has identified a whole portfolio of marketing initiatives, which fall under the encompassing marketing strategy.  Lastly, the suite of marketing initiatives must be prioritized and balanced against the annual marketing budget of $X MM.

Alright, so how do we begin?

The Thought Process

Looking at the information we’ve been presented with, it’s important to identify some logical flow or story through it all.  The flow that I see starts with your high-level marketing strategy.   Within the strategy, there are 3 core pillars, which can be further broken down into specific initiatives.  The marketing strategic and corresponding initiatives will drive X leads.  Visually, the slide in my mind should be structured top-down.  At the top, we have the marketing strategy broken into its 3 parts.  At the bottom, we have the end goal of generating X sales leads.

Let’s transfer this image onto PowerPoint and see how it looks.

Slide Design

Note that, in the diagram above, I placed the Marketing Strategy into a downward pointing chevron shape.  This is to show the top-down nature of the process, where the overarching Marketing Strategy drives everything else on the slide.  Also, I placed the 3 marketing focus areas inside the Marketing Strategy chevron shape to illustrate that they are components of the overall strategy.  Finally, see how I numbered the 3 areas.  Numbering items helps your audience retain that information.  Also, it is advised to keep your lists to 3.  (Read the McKinsey Way for more on magic number 3.)

Our next step is to fit in the rest of the information.  We know we have a full portfolio of marketing initiatives that fall under the Marketing Strategy.  This can be organized by the 3 pillars.  However, to add more structure, we should also organize them functionally.  A great way to organize initiatives or any list of items under 2 dimensions is through a matrix.

For the functional marketing buckets, we can rely on a basic marketing framework, the 4 Ps of marketing.   Additionally, we need to capture the concept of the marketing budget.  This can also be incorporate into the matrix, using the bottom rows.

Let’s take a look at the second iteration of our slide.

Notice at the bottom of the table, I’ve added 2 lines related to the budget.  The first are the marketing expenses.  The second is a status box to check whether the vertical stream of initiatives is on budget or exceeds budget.  I have color coded this status box, so the audience can very easily identify the status.

Depending on what you want your core message to be on the slide, you may want to emphasize the marketing budget portion of the slide.  If you have a stream exceeding the budget, you can further highlight it on your slide using a call-out box and different colors.  Here’s an example.

The slide shown above can be downloaded here.

Bonus Tip – Diagrams as Trackers

To maintain consistency and flow through your presentation from slide to slide, I like to use Trackers.  Trackers are small diagrams (usually placed on the top-right of a slide) that help your audience ‘track’ where you are in your discussion relative to an earlier slide.  For instance, if you’ve introduced the concept of a 6-phase approach, your Tracker is used to signify what phase in the approach your current slide pertains to.

I always try to create diagrams that can easily be leveraged as Trackers.  In the slide we just created, the Marketing Strategy chevron can be made into a tracker.  Take a look below.

Again, the slides created for this tutorial can be downloaded here.

Questions, thoughts, concerns?  Go to my site (learnppt.com) and shoot me an email.

For pre-made PowerPoint diagrams used in business presentations, browse our library here: learnppt.com/powerpoint/.  These diagrams were professionally designed by management consultants. Give your presentations the look and feel of a final product made by McKinsey, BCG, Bain, Booz Allen, Deloitte, or any of the top consulting firms.

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I’ve always said there are 4 key contributing factors to building presentations with incredible speed and efficiency.  These are:

  1. Practice.

  2. Having a robust inventory of slides and diagrams. (Don’t have that?  This will help you out.  Or, get the Basic PowerPoint Toolkit for free.)
  3. Button shortcuts. This is why I still prefer 2003, because it reduces the extra step of toggling among ribbons.
  4. Keyboard shortcuts.

In this post, I will list the 10 keyboard shortcuts that I use most often and that are not immediately obvious. In other words, I won’t include any shortcuts that everyone knows (e.g. Page Up, Ctrl+C).

Alright, here they are, in no particular order.

  • Ctrl + arrow key
    Move objects pixel by pixel.  You may notice, if you just select an object (e.g. shape, group, table) and hit the arrow key, the object will jump by a number of pixels.
  • Ctrl + [
    Decrease font size.
  • Ctrl + ]
    And, likewise, increase font size.
  • Shift + F5
    Go to presentation mode on current slide.
  • Shift + changing size of object
    Maintain ratio of object’s dimensions–i.e. a square will remain a square and not turn into a rectangle when you resize.
  • Ctrl + Shift + G
    Group objects together (in PowerPoint 2003).
  • Ctrl + Shift + H
    Ungroup a group objects (in PowerPoint 2003).
  • Ctrl + click object with mouse
    Creates a duplicate copy of the object.
  • Shift + changing length of line
    Ensures straightness of line.
  • Shift + Alt + right arrow
    Increase indent of a bullet one level deeper.

I hope you’ll find these key PowerPoint shortcuts helpful in becoming faster and more efficient with building your PowerPoint presentations.  You can find a more comprehensive list of useful PowerPoint shortcuts included in Chapter 5 of the eBook, Become a PowerPoint Guru.

Questions, thoughts, concerns?  Go to my site (learnppt.com) and shoot me an email.

For pre-made PowerPoint diagrams used in business presentations, browse our library here: learnppt.com/powerpoint/.  These diagrams were professionally designed by management consultants. Give your presentations the look and feel of a final product made by McKinsey, BCG, Bain, Booz Allen, Deloitte, or any of the top consulting firms.

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The first slide anyone sees in your presentation is always the cover slide.  So, it’s important to start things strong and have a professional, aesthetic, and relevant cover slide.

There are a lot of sites offering free PowerPoint templates.  However, most, if not all, I would never recommend people using—not even to my worst enemy.  So, yesterday, I carved out a few hours and created an appealing, easily customizable set of free PowerPoint templates.  You can download them at http://learnppt.com/free-powerpoint-templates.php.  There are 10 up right now, covering a range of industries, including Financial Services, Medical/Healthcare, Construction, Manufacturing, and General Business.   Take a peek.

So what if you’re looking a very specific template or cover design?  This tutorial will focus on leveraging any one of the templates I put up and customizing it for your specific need.

Let’s walk through an example.

For illustrative purposes, I will pick a very unique example.  We will customize a template for the movie Avatar.

The first step is to download one of the free PowerPoint templates.  Notice that the photo space for the ‘Business People’ template is slighter larger than that of the others.

Now, go to Slide Master mode.  In 2003, this is ‘View’ –> ‘Master’ –> ‘Slide Master.’   In 2007/2010, this is ‘View’ –> ‘Slide Master’ (under ‘Master Views’).

Click on the photo.  You will notice you can easily move it around, resize it, and delete it.  Go ahead and delete it.

Now, find an appropriate replacement photograph on Google Image Search.  I like to use their size filter and filter by ‘Large.’  This way I am left with high resolution pictures.  (FYI, this is the picture I will be using.)

Copy and paste the image into your PowerPoint slide master cover slide.  (If you have a graphics editing program, you may want to use it to reduce the size of the image prior to copying it into PowerPoint.  This will help minimize the PowerPoint’s file size.) Send the photo to the back.

Next, resize and crop as needed.

There you have it.

Questions, thoughts, concerns?  Go to my site (learnppt.com) and shoot me an email.

For pre-made PowerPoint diagrams used in business presentations, browse our library here: learnppt.com/powerpoint/.  These diagrams were professionally designed by management consultants. Give your presentations the look and feel of a final product made by McKinsey, BCG, Bain, Booz Allen, Deloitte, or any of the top consulting firms.

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Representation of lots of data in a visually meaningful and intuitive way can be a daunting task.  In fact, there’s quite a science to it.

When representing multiple dimensions of data on a single diagram, consultants often rely on the 2×2.  Not only is the 2×2 an incredibly flexible and powerful tool, it is also very easy to construct in PowerPoint.  There are many well known frameworks based on this design.  Perhaps the most famous is the BCG Matrix.

If you’re not sure what a 2×2 is, take a look below at BCG’s Growth Share Matrix (or check out this BCG Matrix PowerPoint document for more info).


A 2×2 diagram is simply a Cartesian graph divided into 4 equally sized quadrants.  Circles are then plotted on the graph.  Oftentimes, the upper-right quadrant is the ideal state (for the circles to fall in)—coined by Gartner Research, this quadrant is referred to as the “Magic Quadrant.”

The 2×2 can be used to represent up to 5 dimensions of data.  Let’s break these dimensions down.

The First 2 Dimensions – X-Axis, Y-Axis

The first 2 dimensions are represented by the 2 axes.  Simple enough.

It is customary for the increase in desirability to increase as you increase across each axis (i.e. upwards on the y-axis, towards the right on the a-axis).  This results in the upper right quadrant becoming that “Magic Quadrant.”  Likewise, the bottom-right is the quadrant no one wants to be in.  It often has bleak names, like the “Dead Zone” or “Graveyard.”  Note this is not the case for the Growth-Share Matrix.

The Next 2 Dimensions – Color and Size

The next 2 dimensions are represented by the circles’ colors and sizes.  For color, it is not a continuous scale.  You will usually use the color attribute to separate the circles into 2 or 3 specific categories.  If your circles represent companies, your colors can be used to distinguish incumbent vs. new entrant; public vs. private; or domestic vs. international companies.

Although size is on a continuous scale, it is often difficult to gauge exact relative size.  Therefore, it is best to include a large and small circle in your legend as points of reference.  The size of the circle is often used to represent a relative dollar value.  Examples include market size, size of opportunity, or annual sales.  Remember that, in PowerPoint, you need to hold down the Shift key as you resize shapes to maintain its proportions.

The 5 Dimension – And Beyond?

The 5th dimension is represented by some direction given to the circles.  On a single 2×2, this is represented by an arrow paired with each circle.

This sense of direction tells your audience where the entity is heading.  It tells the story of future projections, market trends, and market dynamics.   A great way to represent this is often with two 2x2s side by side.  This allows your audience to immediately see which circles have remained constant through the years; which have declined; and which have improved their positions.

Do not try to illustrate changes in position using animation within PowerPoint.  In fact, in general, animation is frowned upon.  This is because 1) you will lose the effect on printout copies and 2) people will not see it if they are following along, but not in PowerPoint presentation mode.

It is not recommended to go beyond 5 dimensions.  Otherwise, the slide will look too busy and often your audience won’t be able to retain the information very well.  However, if you feel the need to, you can embed additional dimensions or layers of information by using different shapes (in addition to the circles), perhaps outlines capturing clusters, and meaningful callout boxes.

There is a lot more we can discuss around the 2×2.  In fact, there are full business books written around this very concept.  E.g. Lowy and Hood’s “The Power of the 2×2 Matrix.”

With that said, I hope this is enough food for fodder to get you started on your 2×2 PowerPoint diagramming needs.   If you’re overly ambitious, you can also go for a 3×3 or bigger.

Here are some related resources:

Do you run a consulting firm?  If so, take a look at this article, which discusses Why FlevyPro is a Must Have for Independent Consultants and Boutique Consultancies.

 

By the way, you can download a free PowerPoint plugin called Flevy Tools that creates commonly used consulting diagrams here: http://flevy.com/powerpoint-plugin.  Flevy Tools allows you to dynamically generate Gantt Charts, Harvey Ball diagrams, approach diagrams, and other diagrams.  For the time being, it’s a completely free download.

Questions, thoughts, concerns?  Go to my site (learnppt.com) and shoot me an email.

For pre-made PowerPoint diagrams used in business presentations, browse our library here: learnppt.com/powerpoint/.  These diagrams were professionally designed by management consultants. Give your presentations the look and feel of a final product made by McKinsey, BCG, Bain, Booz Allen, Deloitte, or any of the top consulting firms.

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